.: Game Land :. PC Games Weekly Guide

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My Mega Image Electronic Arts reported that customers used computers for games more than one fifth of the time whether or not they purchased them for work at home. Further improvements to game artwork and audio were made possible with the introduction of FM synthesis sound. Tomb Raider in 1996 was one of the first 3D third-person shooter games and was praised for its revolutionary graphics. By 1990 DOS comprised 65% of the computer-game market, with the Amiga at 10%; all other computers, including the Apple Macintosh, were below 10% and declining. While many companies used the additional storage to release poor-quality shovelware collections of older software, or "enhanced" versions of existing ones,[28] new games such as Myst included many more assets for a richer game experience. There were also several other companies that produced early first-person shooters, such as Arsys Software's Star Cruiser,[23] which featured fully 3D polygonal graphics in 1988,[24] and Accolade's Day of the Viper in 1989.
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By 1993 PC games required much more memory than other software, often consuming all of conventional memory, while peripheral device drivers could go into upper memory with DOS memory managers. As with second-generation video game consoles at the time, early home computer game companies capitalized on successful arcade games at the time with ports or clones of popular arcade games.[6][7] By 1982, the top-selling games for the Atari 400 were ports of Frogger and Centipede, while the top-selling game for the Texas Instruments TI-99/4A was the Space Invaders clone TI Invaders.[6] That same year, Pac-Man was ported to the Atari 800,[7] while Donkey Kong was licensed for the Coleco Adam.[8] In late 1981, Atari attempted to take legal action against unauthorized clones, particularly Pac-Man clones, despite some of these predating Atari's exclusive rights to the home versions of Namco's game. As 3D graphics libraries such as DirectX and OpenGL matured and knocked proprietary interfaces out of the market, these platforms gained greater acceptance in the market, particularly with their demonstrated benefits in games such as Unreal.[33] However, major changes to the Microsoft Windows operating system, by then the market leader, made many older DOS-based games unplayable on Windows NT, and later, Windows XP (without using an emulator, such as DOSbox).

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  • Without question, Nintendo's success has eroded software sales.
  • During this time, the improvements introduced with products such as ATI's Radeon R300 and NVidia's GeForce 6 Series have allowed developers to increase the complexity of modern game engines. By 1990 DOS comprised 65% of the computer-game market, with the Amiga at 10%; all other computers, including the Apple Macintosh, were below 10% and declining.
Further improvements to game artwork and audio were made possible with the introduction of FM synthesis sound.